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Mac OS 10.1

by Derrick Story
08/17/2001

Dear Mac Reader,

When I read Garry Barker's interview of Avie Tevanian, Apple's senior vice president of software engineering, I was intrigued by Avie's statement that Mac OS 10.1 runs five times faster than the first build of Mac OS X.

That's big news as far as I'm concerned (if it's true). In my opinion, there are only two things holding Mac OS X back from increasing Apple's market share of OS software: 1) Lack of applications, and 2) Speed.

The dearth of applications is only a temporary barrier. For example, I just tested and published a review of Connectix's Virtual PC for Mac OS X. It's terrific (but sluggish). Then, talking to O'Reilly developer Rael Dornfest, who's in contact with Microsoft, I learned that MS Office 10 is rolling along beautifully. We'll review it as soon as we have the beta.

Adobe's continued to remain mum about Carbonizing Photoshop, but they seem to be making good progress toward porting many of their other applications. Macromedia, on the other hand, is "all over" Mac OS X. Freehand 10 has been out for months. By MacWorld 2002 in SF, I think we're going to have just about every application we need to use Apple's new operating system on a daily basis.

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So, speed remains the big question. How long will it take the Apple engineers to adjust the memory management of Mac OS X (among other optimizations) to give us an OS that moves at the same speed that we do while we work? It sounds to me that Mac OS 10.1 might be a big step in that direction.

Right now I'm recommending Mac OS X to PowerBook owners who have a FireWire Pismos or one of the new iBooks or TiG4s. I can't wait for the day when I can recommend Mac OS X to everyone who runs modern Apple hardware. The release of Mac OS 10.1 will give us a good idea about how far away that day might be.

Until Next Time,

Derrick

PS: The URL for Garry Barker's interview of Avie Tevanian is: http://it.mycareer.com.au/news/2001/08/07/FFXX10051QC.html

Features

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Working with Tables: Writing an Address Book Application
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Life After AirPort -- New Wireless Base Stations
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Virtual PC Brings Windows to Mac OS X
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  4. Virtual PC Brings Windows to Mac OS X
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Talk Backs

Amazing Media Player Brings PDA Video to Life
Subject: Behind the times, eh?
From: tjotala

Maybe I'm missing something here, but what exactly is the big deal about this "new capability?" You've been able to do this, and much better, for years now on the various Windows CE/Pocket PC devices. Is this omission simply because those are not the properly "blessed" environment of Mac/Palm? Mind you, many of those MS-infested devices can also run Linux... I find this kind of selective blindness disconcerting, especially in an article from a generally reputable technical source (O'Reilly).

Amazing Media Player Brings PDA Video to Life
Subject: Behind the times, eh?
From: derrick
Response to: Behind the times, eh?

The big deal is that this capability is now available on devices that run Palm OS. This is not an article about competition between Palms and Pocket PCs. If you already have a Palm OS device, why should you have to switch to an iPaq just to play a QuickTime movie? As far as selective blindness goes ... take a look at the context of the article. It's a QuickTime column running on the Mac DevCenter. If you're such a Pocket PC fan, what are you doing in the Mac DevCenter? Pocket PCs don't even support Macs.

We write about Pocket PCs, Linux PDAs, and yes, Palm devices. There's no blindness around here, I assure you.

Life After AirPort -- New Wireless Base Stations
Subject: airport card
From: tedlin

I've been using an SMC Barricade since Life After Airport Part I. (I posted a comment to that article, in fact.) Since then, I've returned my internal airport card to Fry's, since its range with my TiBook was so pathetic. I'm now using an Orinoco WaveLan Gold card under OS X with the open source drivers presently being developed by Rob McKeever and others (yay!). It's not feature-complete yet, and it's less convenient to have to use a PC Card, but for me, the performance increase makes it worthwhile. (Btw, the standard airport drivers under OS 9 support the WaveLan card.)

-ted

Working with Tables: Writing an Address Book Application
Subject: Off topic questions
From: CanyonRat

I suppose everyone noticed that you can't send an array message to an NSMutableDictionary class object and have it work? Should there be an @private directive at the start of the instance variable declarations in Controller.h to indicate it's a concrete class? Does ObjC use some other convention to disclose the author's intention about whether the class is concrete or abstract?

I notice that ObjC programmers tend to declare public accessors for everything and use messages to self rather than in preference to assignment. This does make the program flow better, but it also is a very different attitude than the typical C++ programmer's fetish for encapsulation. Those guys begrudge every little chink in he armor around their instance variables. I can hear them looking at typical ObjC code and sniffing, "with that many accessors it's not an object, it's just a sruct."

So who is (mostly) right? Is the ObjC style the enemy of scaling to large projects? Is the C++ style just a knee-jerk?


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